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Session [clear filter]
Monday, February 6
 

8:30am

Engaging Library Users in Collection Development
Collection development is often an exercise in anticipating user interests, but it can also be an active collaboration between librarians and library users through consultation, special projects, or a patron driven acquisitions process. The speakers in this session will present case studies demonstrating different ways librarians can work directly with library users to shape collections. Anne Trenholme will describe how the Ingalls Library at the Cleveland Museum of Art successfully petitioned for grant funding for working with new curatorial staff to ensure that the library supports their research interests. Caroline Dechert will present on how the library and curatorial staff work together to grow the artist files collection in the Bartlett Library at the Museum of International Folk Art. Deborah K. Ultan will explain how the zine collection at the Architecture and Landscape Architecture Library at the University of Minnesota offers a variety of opportunities for user engagement with the library. John Burns will detail his methods for working with faculty in the art department to collaborate on building the monographs collection in the Dixie State University Library. Expanding on the idea of working with faculty in a department, Laurel Bliss will explain how she worked with a new faculty member at San Diego State University to focus on developing the library’s collection of materials on a specific subject, in this case jewelry and metalworking. Finally, Jennifer H. Krivickas will outline how patron driven acquisitions is part of collaborative collection development in the Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning Library at the University of Cincinnati.

Laurel Bliss, Fine Arts Librarian, San Diego State University
John Burns, Reference and Instruction Librarian, Dixie State University
Caroline Dechert, Librarian and Archivist, Bartlett Library, Museum of International Folk Art
Jennifer H. Krivickas, Assistant Vice President for Integrated Research; Head, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning Library; Instructor, DAAP Schools of Design & Art, University of Cincinnati
Anne Trenholme, Acquisitions and Collection Development Librarian, Ingalls Library and Archives, Cleveland Museum of Art
Deborah K. Ultan, Arts & Architecture Librarian, University of Minnesota

Moderators
avatar for Amy Trendler

Amy Trendler

Architecture Librarian, Ball State University
Architecture Librarian, Ball State University

Speakers
avatar for Laurel Bliss

Laurel Bliss

San Diego State University
Fine Arts Librarian, San Diego State University
avatar for Deborah Ultan Boudewyns

Deborah Ultan Boudewyns

Arts & Architecture Librarian, University of Minnesota
avatar for John Burns

John Burns

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Dixie State University
Libraries and just about everything else! I am a librarian...we love everything!
avatar for Caroline Dechert

Caroline Dechert

Librarian and Archivist, Museum of International Folk Art
Librarian and Archivist, Bartlett Library, Museum of International Folk Art
JH

Jennifer H. Krivickas

Assistant Vice President for Integrated Research; Head, Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning Library; Instructor, DAAP Schools of Design & Art, University of Cincinnati
avatar for Anne Trenholme

Anne Trenholme

Acquisitions and Collection Development Librarian, Ingalls Library, Cleveland Museum of Art


Monday February 6, 2017 8:30am - 10:00am
Jefferson Ballroom Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

10:15am

When Research Doesn’t Start with a Question: Teaching with the Framework within Art and Architecture Librarianship
This lightening panel session will provide insight into innovative teaching approaches for engaging a wide range of art, design, and architecture students and faculty through instruction sessions, online courses, and structured workshops. Participants will discuss how they mapped the Visual Literacy Competency Standards and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education to their institution’s goals for instruction.

After the brief presentations, the audience will be invited to roundtable discussions led by the presenters. Groups will discuss how participants have experimented, implemented, or mapped the Visual Literacy Competency Standards and the Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education. Groups will report back for final questions and discussion. An online component will accompany the session that will include handouts authored by panel participants, a bibliography, and session groupshare materials. Panel co-organizers and moderator will build and host this on the ARLIS/NA RISS Wordpress website for future discovery and collaboration by ARLIS/NA members.

Moderators
avatar for Amanda Meeks

Amanda Meeks

Arts and Humanities Librarian, Northern Arizona University
I'm interested in critical visual and information literacy practices, critical and feminist pedagogy.

Speakers
avatar for Courtney Baron

Courtney Baron

Teaching and Learning Librarian, Oxford College of Emory University
Courtney Baron is the Teaching and Learning Librarian at Oxford College of Emory University. She leads the Research Practices team and coordinates the instruction program for the Oxford College Library. She is a member of the Oxford College Library's Student Employment Team and Website Team. Outside of Oxford College Library, she serves on the Emory Libraries' Information Literacy Framework Task Force, the Advisory Board for the Center of... Read More →
avatar for Stephanie Beene

Stephanie Beene

Fine Arts Librarian for Art, Architecture + Planning, The University of New Mexico
Education, outreach, the arts in all variation. Beauty in the details, meaning in the whole. The great outdoors. The importance of preserving it all for the future.
avatar for John Burns

John Burns

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Dixie State University
Libraries and just about everything else! I am a librarian...we love everything!
avatar for Stephanie Grimm

Stephanie Grimm

Art and Art History Librarian, George Mason University
Reader, researcher, and sometimes maker of comics.
avatar for Ellen Petraits

Ellen Petraits

Research & Instruction Librarian, Rhode Island School of Design
avatar for Shannon Marie Robinson

Shannon Marie Robinson

Liaison Librarian, Media Arts & Design, Drexel University


Monday February 6, 2017 10:15am - 11:45am
Jefferson Ballroom Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

1:00pm

Placemaking and Urban Renewal: Art for Change
This lightning panel session will address the concept of placemaking and the role art librarians have taken in the urban revitalization of public spaces Placemaking is a people-centered, multi-faceted approach to planning, designing, and managing public spaces to fit the needs and aspirations of the communities who work, live, and play in these spaces. Panelists will discuss innovative projects which have acted as a catalyst for urban regeneration. Whether grassroots or institutionally-based, panelists will address artistic communities’ intervention in urban spaces, how these artistic communities are initiated, maintained, promoted and disseminated, and collaborative initiatives with external constituents. Through the panel presentations and subsequent roundtable discussion, the ARLISN/A membership is invited to a larger discussion of the role art librarians and visual resources professionals play in the process of urban revitalization. This panel was organized by the Urban & Regional Planning Special Interest Group.

Moderators
avatar for Marsha Taichman

Marsha Taichman

Visual Resources & Public Services Librarian, Cornell University
Visual Resources & Public Services Librarian, Cornell University

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Beene

Stephanie Beene

Fine Arts Librarian for Art, Architecture + Planning, The University of New Mexico
Education, outreach, the arts in all variation. Beauty in the details, meaning in the whole. The great outdoors. The importance of preserving it all for the future.
avatar for Teresa M. Burk

Teresa M. Burk

Director of the ACA Library, Savannah College of Art and Design
avatar for Sean Knowlton

Sean Knowlton

Scholarly Engagement Librarian (Humanities), Tulane University
RP

Rebecca Price

Architecture, Urban Planning, and Visual Resources Librarian, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor
HS

Heidi Schmalbach

PhD student in City, Culture and Community at Tulane

Sponsors
avatar for Savannah College of Art and Design

Savannah College of Art and Design

Sponsor of the Placemaking and Urban Renewal: Art for Change Session |


Monday February 6, 2017 1:00pm - 2:30pm
Jefferson Ballroom Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

1:30pm

Le Bibliothécaire Solo: Success in the Diverse World of Solo Art Librarianship

The world of solo librarianship is perhaps the most diverse subset of librarianship yet at the same time often overlooked. In 2015, the Solo Art Librarians Special Interest Group was resurrected because ARLIS/NA members expressed a need for more professional support and conference content geared towards solo librarianship. In one short year the SIG has attracted close to 100 members. This 90-minute panel of lightening round presentations will scale-down topics for solo librarians. Topics range from job training to strategic planning and everything in between—totally encompassing the diversity of solo librarianship. Further, presenters represent many different types of institutions: academic, museums, public and private, but are inclusive to solo librarianship. These lightening talks will help any art librarian that wears many hats achieve success without adequate personnel support or bottomless budgets.

 

Barbara Opar, Librarian for Architecture, Syracuse University Libraries

The Embedded Librarian- Engagement is Key

The successful embedded librarian must be truly engaged in both the discipline and the department(s) served. But what does “embedded mean? It is different at different institutions. I will briefly address what embedded means in terms of my role as Architecture Librarian at Syracuse where I am a solo librarian overseeing a reserve book unit, providing reference help, and developing the collection for both the ARR and the Libraries in general. Events like the student book club and our Materials Focus sessions are key to showing engagement. So what are the benefits for all parties in terms of being embedded? Is there a down side? This brief overview of my role at Syracuse will include thoughts about the pluses- mostly- and a few negatives.  

 

Traci Timmons – Seattle Art Museum – TraciT@SeattleArtMuseum.org

Advocacy for the Solo Librarian

For most libraries, advocacy is important. Art libraries are typically not cost-centers or direct drivers of revenue for our institutions. Because of this, effective advocacy can be the thing that keeps us alive in times of trouble. Being a self-advocate or encouraging others to be advocates for our libraries and/or staff positions can be challenging and require some of us to act outside of personal comfort zones. This brief presentation will address several advocacy strategies that have had positive effects on a medium-sized museum library with a solo librarian.

 

Jasmine Burns – Indiana University Bloomington – burnsjas@indiana.edu

Advocating for Branch Libraries

This presentation approaches the topic of Advocating for Branch Libraries through a discussion of the ways in which a solo librarian can transform their patrons, departments, and communities into advocates for their library. Examples will be given of how these goals can ultimately be reached through the creation of a variety of outreach initiatives (in departments, through the larger library system, and campus-wide), their implementation, and the measurement of their impact.

 

Anna Elam – Seattle Art Museum – AnnaE@seattleartmuseum.org

Space Planning as a Solo Librarian

Anna Elam, Librarian/Educator for the Ann P. Wyckoff Teacher Resource Center at the Seattle Art Museum, will share tips and tricks for solo librarians to track their current space situations and plan for a move into a space that already exists. The session audience will walk away with real world examples and lessons from the trenches of a current library move.



Caroline Dechert – Librarian and Archivist, Museum of International Folk Art –  Caroline.Dechert@state.nm.us

Creative IT Partnerships for the Solo Librarian

IT solutions – library systems, digital asset management systems, and their kin - are typically built to be efficient and affordable at scale. How can a solo librarian with little or no dedicated IT support or budget keep up? This presentation takes a swift look at two cases where a combination of open source software and an open mind about unusual partnerships created opportunities. Case 1: Two solo librarians team up to form a mini-consortium, sharing a hosted open source Koha ILS. Case 2: By agreeing to act a test case, a solo librarian gets her own implementation of an open source software digital asset management system.

 

Lucy Campbell – NewSchool of Architecture and Design –  lcampbell@newschoolarch.edu

Solo Strategic Planning

How can you be sure you are making the best decisions for your institution? When there are no colleagues to discuss pros and cons with or bounce ideas off, making major strategic plans can be paralyzing. This presentation will outline some approaches to strategic planning solo, and offer methods to ensure you can have confidence in the success of your library.

 

Jessica Shaykett – American Craft Council – jshaykett@craftcouncil.org

Professional Development for Solo Professionals

Taking advantage of professional development opportunities can help alleviate the sense of isolation that accompanies working as a solo librarian. However, support and funding for conference and workshop attendance within a small organization can often be difficult to come by. Jessica Shaykett, librarian at the American Craft Council, will discuss the challenges solo staff face when it comes to professional development, as well as share tips for garnering institutional support.  

 

Cathryn Copper – Woodbury University School of Architecture – Cathryn.copper@woodbury.edu

Leadership for the Solo Librarian: How to Grow When there is Nowhere Up to Go

A scaled-down version of Harvard’s Leadership Institute for Academic Librarians that applies concepts for solo librarians. How does a solo librarian increase their leadership and management capacity when there is nowhere up to go? The expectations of library leaders are changing and solo librarians need to remain competitive. This lightening talk will provide tools to assess leadership strengths and weaknesses and highlight examples of implementation for librarians without the luxury of a support staff.

 

 Gabriella Karl-Johnson, Architecture Librarian, School of Architecture, Princeton University gjk@princeton.edu

Job Training for the Solo Librarian

As a librarian entering a solo position, it can be difficult to know where to begin. How do you learn to do what you do, when you’re the only one doing it? If documentation is minimal, as can be the case at many institutions, reliance on internal and external colleagues can be essential for success. This talk will present real-world examples of techniques for developing job knowledge, including strategies for knowledge gathering from supervisors, support staff, and colleagues in similar roles.


Moderators
avatar for Lucy Campbell

Lucy Campbell

Librarian, NewSchool of Architecture and Design
CC

Cathryn Copper

Woodbury University

Speakers
avatar for Jasmine Burns

Jasmine Burns

Visual Resources Metadata Librarian, Cornell University
avatar for Caroline Dechert

Caroline Dechert

Librarian and Archivist, Museum of International Folk Art
Librarian and Archivist, Bartlett Library, Museum of International Folk Art
AE

Anna Elam

Associate Manager for Educator Resources, Seattle Art Museum
Seattle Art Museum
avatar for Gabriella Karl-Johnson

Gabriella Karl-Johnson

Architecture Librarian, Princeton University
avatar for Jessica Shaykett

Jessica Shaykett

American Craft Council
American Craft Council;
avatar for Traci Timmons

Traci Timmons

Librarian, Seattle Art Museum
Seattle Art Museum


Monday February 6, 2017 1:30pm - 3:00pm
Commerce Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

3:15pm

Music Plenary: Pulse Points and Backbeats
Louisiana is home to a vibrant and dizzying variety of deep-rooted musical genres, each with a distinctive pulse and culture: from zydeco, Cajun, gospel, rhythm & blues, soul, and country to rockabilly, roots rock, funk, hip hop, bounce, Mardi Gras Indian, and an entire spectrum of jazz—traditional to avant-garde, contemporary to brass-band parades and funerals. All of these streams flow into and out of New Orleans, this city at the culmination of a mighty cultural river. This afternoon’s plenary celebrates the unique musical mix that is New Orleans by showcasing some of the institutional and independent initiatives that sustain, document, and celebrate these distinctive musical cultures and the musicians who bring them to life.

The historians on our panel—all musicians themselves—are actively engaged in promoting and curating these traditions for the public, yet always attuned to fresh new musical expressions and directions. We look forward to introducing you all to the deep and varied rhythms that emanate from the Crescent City, as a special segue to this evening’s welcome reception at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Dr. Michael White, jazz clarinetist, bandleader, recording artist, and professor of African-American music at Xavier University;

Bruce Raeburn, jazz and rock drummer, Director of Special Collections, Tulane University, and curator of the Hogan Jazz Archive;

Melissa A. Weber/DJ Soul Sister, writer, historian, artist, and long-time host of "Soul Power" on WWOZ FM, the longest-running rare groove radio show in the U.S.;

Ben Sandmel, music journalist, folklorist, musician, author of Ernie K-Doe: The R&B Emperor of New Orleans, and producer of the Music Heritage Stage at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.

Panel organizer: Kathy Edwards, Clemson University.

Moderators
avatar for Kathy Edwards

Kathy Edwards

Research & Collection Development Librarian, Emery A. Gunnin Architecture Library

Speakers
avatar for Bruce Raeburn

Bruce Raeburn

Director of Special Collections, Tulane University
jazz and rock drummer, Director of Special Collections, Tulane University, and curator of the Hogan Jazz Archive;
avatar for Ben Sandmel

Ben Sandmel

music journalist, folklorist, musician, author of Ernie K-Doe: The R&B Emperor of New Orleans, and producer of the Music Heritage Stage at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.
avatar for Melissa A. Weber

Melissa A. Weber

DJ Soul Sister, writer, historian, artist, and long-time host of "Soul Power" on WWOZ FM, the longest-running rare groove radio show in the U.S.;
avatar for Michael White

Michael White

jazz clarinetist, bandleader, recording artist, and professor of African-American music at Xavier University;

Sponsors
A

Anonymous

Sponsor of the Music Plenary: Pulse Points and Backbeats


Monday February 6, 2017 3:15pm - 4:45pm
Jefferson Ballroom Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130
 
Tuesday, February 7
 

9:30am

Digitization and preservation: Small Easy and Built Environment Resource Directory (BERD)
Every year at the ARLIS/NA conference, those of us who work at small museum libraries with one or two staff members are inspired by the large scale projects of our big sisters. How can we translate this inspiration to action with small means and little staff? Over the past year the Menil Collection has embarked on small scale digitization and access projects that are budget neutral, but provide access to information and resources generated by our museum that were previously only found in our archives. Through repackaging born digital gallery guides and ephemera to capturing and cataloguing finding aids and foundation documents we are beginning to make our entire exhibition history available globally for the first time. Using our own library catalogue and shared resources such as OCLC Discovery and the Getty Research Portal, digital surrogates of our important ephemeral publications are now part of the scholarly record. We have developed workflows that integrate this work into our schedule seamlessly. This has not only made valuable information more accessible, but also helped raise the library’s profile within the broader digital initiatives of our museum. It is our hope that our work will be helpful not only to scholars and researchers who will now have access to our content, but also as a model for our colleagues in smaller institutions who wish to make their own museum’s ephemera more widely available and help them overcome the intimidation that sometime accompanies such endeavors when we do not have large staffs and deep pockets.uilt Environment Resource Directory of the Washington, DC Metro Area (BERD) is an innovative “open” reference publication that embodies best practices of open scholarship. This new electronic monographic edition is current and efficient in design and content retrieval, has enhanced interactivity, and is universally available. It is geared to architects, historians, librarians, preservationists, planners and real estate developers. Discovery can be made inside the directory itself, but also through search engines. The directory is accessed not only via a web-browser but also via a mobile website. A further enhancement is the use of a mapping plug-in to provide geographic visualization and orientation. By design, this research project utilized principles of the "open research cycle." This paper will articulate what the open research cycle is and how BERD meets open scholarship criteria as defined by the Association of Research Libraries. It will demonstrate how the many opportunities for editorial and project management decisions in producing a publication like BERD can be focused on reaching the goal of a sustainable open resource. We will cover the following topics: data management plans for preservation and sharing data, public domain content, metadata (Dublin Core, VRA Core), name authorities (LC, Getty Thesaurus of Artists Name), open source platforms and plug-ins that create open functionalities, open access, Creative Commons Licensing, crowdsourcing for peer review and discovery enhancement, self-archiving in institutional repositories, and google analytics.

Moderators
Speakers
PC

Patricia Cossard

Art Librarian, University of Maryland
avatar for Lauren Gottlieb-Miller

Lauren Gottlieb-Miller

Assistant Librarian, The Menil Collection
avatar for Eric Wolf

Eric Wolf

Head Librarian, The Menil Collection


Tuesday February 7, 2017 9:30am - 10:30am
Commerce Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

9:30am

How to Develop a Comic Book and Graphic Novel Collection
This panel will weave together four projects in graphic novel and comic book collection development that provide insight on issues of acquiring, processing, accessing, and archiving these collections. Penny Baker’s paper concentrates on the Clark Art Institute's acquisition of photographer, filmmaker and theorist Allan Sekula’s collection of political comics and graphic novels. Baker will describe the processing of the collection and its possible impact on the future direction of the Clark Art Institute’s collection development policies while covering issues centering on discovery and access. As comics creators increasingly publish their work online through blogs, social media sites, and through online only webcomics, libraries are challenged to acquire this material that can enrich and inform extant print collections. Megan Halsband will discuss the two webcomics collections at the Library of Congress, outlining some of the successes and challenges, as well as posing some questions about collaborative collecting. With over 40 years of experience in Latin American Studies, Peter Stern’s paper will cover collecting Latin American graphic novels at the University of Massachusetts. Marianne R. Williams’ paper will give an overview of her experience creating a collection development policy for graphic novels for the Hart House Library at the University of Toronto, and will include suggestions and tips on where to start collecting and acquiring comic books for your library. We hope to share our experiences and insights working with comic books and graphic novels to inspire others to either begin similar collections within their own library or share relevant resources in acquiring and processing these materials.

Moderators
avatar for Olivia Miller

Olivia Miller

Public Services Librarian, Greensboro College

Speakers
avatar for Penny Baker

Penny Baker

Collections Management Librarian, Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute Library
avatar for Megan Halsband

Megan Halsband

Reference Librarian, Serial & Government Publications Division, Library of Congress
PS

Peter Stern

Fine Arts Librarian, University of Massachusetts
MW

Marianne Williams

Library Practicum, The Banff Centre


Tuesday February 7, 2017 9:30am - 10:30am
Camp Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

9:30am

Visual Literacy for All! - Instruction in the Self-directed Digital Era
Sponsored by Lousiana State University

Easy access to images on the internet means students are using finding and making use of them more than ever, which begs the following questions: Do they fully understand what and why they’re using these images? Are they finding the images they want? Do students care about visual literacy when so much is instantly available to find, copy and paste? In this panel of librarians and LIS faculty, research into the use of images, visual literacy pedagogy and successful examples of visual literacy instruction will be discussed, including the tools and plans used for three different exercises. A varied demographic range of students will be covered: undergraduate, graduate, studio and non-art majors alike. Interviews and surveys with students who have used images in their academic work or participated in visual literacy instruction, or with the faculty who work with these students, have been compiled by each presenter, providing qualitative data regarding the need for, and success of, visual literacy instruction for various academic groups.

Moderators
EE

Erin Elzi

Cataloging and Metadata Librarian, University of Denver
cataloging and Metadata Librarian, University of Denver

Speakers
avatar for Anna Harper

Anna Harper

Reference and Instruction Librarian, Visiting Faculty, University of Denver
avatar for Karyn Hinkle

Karyn Hinkle

Art Librarian, University of Kentucky
avatar for Krystyna Matusiak

Krystyna Matusiak

Assistant Professor in Library and Information Science Program (LIS), University of Denver
Krystyna K. Matusiak has been working as an Assistant Professor in the Library & Information Science Program (LIS) at the Morgridge College of Education since September 2011. She earned her MLIS and PhD from University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Prior to accepting her position at the University of Denver, she worked as a Digital Collections Librarian for ten years and was the Head of the Digitization Unit at the University of... Read More →
avatar for Mackenzie Salisbury

Mackenzie Salisbury

Reference and Instruction Librarian, School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Reference & Instruction Librarian, School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Sponsors
avatar for Louisiana State University Libraries

Louisiana State University Libraries

Sponsor of the Visual Literacy for All! - Instruction in the Self-directed Digital Era Session


Tuesday February 7, 2017 9:30am - 10:30am
Royal Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

10:45am

Collaborations that Re-envision Library Management, Service, and Space: Two Perspectives on Some Trending Shifts in Libraries
This panel will cover a range of new challenges in art and academic libraries today as management and the services we provide are collapsed, expanded, and re-imagined in a multitude of ways. We are all finding ways to reinvent our libraries and keep them relevant, whether those changes come from within the organization or are result of a grant or a mandate from the outside. In a time of dwindling resources for many institutions, libraries need to adapt to ever-changing trends in higher education.   

Rachel Resnik will discuss her library’s recent transition from a traditional director-led library to a team-managed organization with a rotating chair at the helm. She will explain the impetus for the change, how the library is adapting, and will attempt to identify the challenges she foresees encountering as they move forward.

Rachel Beckwith will talk about the progress of the Hampshire College Library’s mellon grant to develop a knowledge commons.   Their goal is to bring together service partners, such as the Writing Center, Transformative Speaking Center, and Student Support and Advising, within the integrated space of the Harold F. Johnson Library in order to make the student experience more seamless and to discover different connections and intersections that new adjacencies afford.

Moderators
Speakers
avatar for Rachel Beckwith

Rachel Beckwith

Access and Arts Librarian, Hampshire College
RR

Rachel Resnik

Library Chair, Massachusetts College of Art and Design Library


Tuesday February 7, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
Royal Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

10:45am

Hacks and Innovative Approaches to Cataloging Non-Roman Script Materials
At many institutions the challenge of identifying and acquiring material from under-represented and previously inaccessible regions has been superseded by the challenge of cataloging it properly and promptly. Our panel session will have two speakers addressing this topic: Jared Ash, Assistant Museum Librarian for Slavic and Special Collections (Thomas J. Watson Library), will discuss recent initiatives adopted by Watson, and share innovative tips and free online resources to enable even the most language- and staff-limited libraries to begin making their way through non-Roman script backlogs. He will discuss the Watson’s success in using Metadata Maker, an open access record generator, and in engaging volunteers, work-study students and interns in cataloging Asian and Slavic language material. He also will share time-saving techniques including: using transliteration engines and macros; importing MARC records from national library catalogs and other resources beyond WorldCat; and identifying books with no Roman characters or ISBN's through reverse image searching. Christina Peter, Head of Acquisitions (Frick Art Reference Library), will introduce the updated version of the Slavic Cataloging Manual. The implementation of RDA necessitated a complete review of this tool, essential for catalogers of Slavic and Eastern European language materials. In 2014 the Slavic and Eastern European Section of ACRL formed a Task Force to review the SCM. 22 librarians with a variety of language and subject expertise volunteered for the project led by Larisa Walsh (University of Chicago). By the time the Task Force finished its work in March 2016, 145 chapters, new and revised, had been uploaded to the manual. Ms. Peter oversaw the work of the Authority Control Group, which revised 49 chapters. The manual may serve as a practical model for other language- or script-specific cataloging websites, hopefully breaking down the impediments to describing and making these materials accessible to all.

Moderators
avatar for Tamara Fultz

Tamara Fultz

Associate Museum Librarian, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library

Speakers
avatar for Jared Ash

Jared Ash

Assistant Museum Librarian, Slavic and Special Collections, Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library
avatar for Christina Peter

Christina Peter

Head, Acquisitions, Frick Art Reference Library


Tuesday February 7, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
Camp Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

10:45am

NDSR Art
The National Digital Stewardship Residency for art information professionals (NDSR Art) seeks to create a dialogue and promote strategies for digital stewardship in the art information community. Beginning in the summer of 2017, NDSR Art will embed eight residents in art and cultural organizations across the country. Through the ARLIS/NA network, NDSR Art will encourage skill sharing amongst institutions facing similar digital preservation challenges while providing recent graduates with hands-on professional training. This panel session will set the stage for further collaborative dialogues and introduce the selected 2017/18 residency projects.

Moderators
avatar for Karina Wratschko

Karina Wratschko

Special Projects Librarian, Philadelphia Museum of Art

Speakers
avatar for George Coulbourne

George Coulbourne

Chief, Internships and Fellowships, Library of Congress
Library of Congress
JN

Jacob Nadal

Executive Director of the Research Collections and Preservation Consortium, Princeton University
KR

Kristen Regina

Arcadia Director of the Library and Archives, Philadelphia Museum of Art
avatar for Shalimar Fojas White

Shalimar Fojas White

Collection Development Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University


Tuesday February 7, 2017 10:45am - 11:45am
Commerce Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

2:15pm

Impacts of Working with Linked Data
Linked open data (LOD) is a huge trend in libraries, archives, and museums, but what does it actually take to accomplish an LOD project? And, now that we’ve made LOD, how can it be consumed? Moreover, what effects does it have on your institutional capacity and teamwork? This panel will address the realities of choosing or developing appropriate tools, presenting RDF data to users, and creating documentation. It will also discuss the larger impacts of LOD projects on institutional infrastructure. Alexandra Provo and Lukas Klic will outline the final phase of the Villa I Tatti project, Florentine Drawings: A Linked Catalogue for the Semantic Web. Cory Lampert will discuss an experimental interface that queries University of Las Vegas linked open data. Emilee Mathews and Kelly Spring will present the concrete effects of collaboration between catalogers, archivists, IT specialists, and subject librarians on piloting linked open data for artists’ books at the University of California, Irvine.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah Seymore

Sarah Seymore

Digital Collections Metadata Librarian, University of Oregon Libraries
Sarah Seymore joined the Digital Scholarship Center at the UO Libraries in March 2014 after completing her MLIS from Rutgers University. She is interested in digital collection cataloging, digitization project management, and metadata and Linked Open Data.

Speakers
avatar for Lukas Klic

Lukas Klic

Manager of Information Services & Digital Initiatives, Villa I Tatti, Harvard University
avatar for Cory Lampert

Cory Lampert

Head, Digital Collections, UNLV Libraries
Head, Digital Collections, UNLV
avatar for Emilee Mathews

Emilee Mathews

Research Librarian for Visual Arts, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Alexandra Provo

Alexandra Provo

Digital Production Editor, NYU
I'm the 2016-2017 Visual Resources Division moderator. At this year's conference, I'll be speaking about my work as Project Manager, Florentine Renaissance Drawings: A Linked Catalogue for the Semantic Web, Villa I Tatti, Harvard University. I'll also be sharing some fair use-related work I did as the 2015-2016 Kress Fellow in Art Librarianship.
avatar for Kelly Spring

Kelly Spring

Archivist for Special Collections & Archives, University of California, Irvine
University of California, Irvine


Tuesday February 7, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Commerce Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

2:15pm

Making Collections Accessible: Legal Tools for the 21st Century
Three leading IP lawyers will present tools and strategies for addressing the intellectual property, privacy and contract rights associated with works. They will address best practices, copyright duration, fair use, 108, moral rights, and systems that can be scaled up from one work to thousands of works. They will also discuss collections that have been opened for specific uses and the growing presence of older collections that have been digitized and now populate the Web. The audience will come away with a firm strategy and understanding of what legal issues may or may not arise in any given collection, and how to assess the legal issues when they do arise. This information will lower the barrier in making library and archival collections more open to all. Kenneth Crews is a leading authority in addressing copyright as it relates to the needs of universities, colleges, libraries, museums, publishers and other cultural organizations He is trained as a librarian and a lawyer, and has advised nearly everyone in the world on copyright issues. Greg Cram focuses his time on solving the copyright issues at the New York Public Library and has been a huge voice in DPLA. Elizabeth Townsend Gard has invented the Durationator, a global copyright tool to determine not only the term of a work, but other issues including library exceptions, termination of transfer, moral rights, and other issues that arise in determining whether a work is still under copyright or in the public domain. Deborah Kempe will serve as moderator. This session will be recorded and made accessible after the conference in the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal.

Moderators
avatar for Deborah Kempe

Deborah Kempe

Chief, Collections Management & Access, Frick Art Reference Library of The Frick Collection
I am Chief of Collections Management & Access at The Frick Art Reference Library of The Frick Collection, in New York, with previous positions held at the Avery Art & Architectural Library of Columbia University, New York University, the New-York Historical Society, and the University of Arkansas. My academic background includes a BA with Honors in Art History and Archaeology and an MLS, both from the University of Missouri. I'm active in... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Greg Cram

Greg Cram

Associate Director, Copyright and Information Policy, The New York Public Library
KC

Kenneth Crews

Attorney, Gibson, Hoffman, Pancione
ET

Elizabeth Townsend Gard

Jill H. and Avram A. Glazer Professor in Social Entrepreneurship; Associate Professor in Law; Co-Founder and Co-Director, Tulane Center for IP Law and Culture, Tulane University


Tuesday February 7, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Royal Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

2:15pm

Temporary and Transitional: The Evolution of Art Library Spaces
The renovation and building of art library spaces involves a number of moving parts as librarians consider how to preserve services and access to collections both throughout the process and following project completion. This session, sponsored by the Space Planning Special Interest Group, will feature three speakers (each offering 15-20 minute presentations) who will address challenges faced and lessons learned from their experiences of renovating, reorganizing, and restructuring art library spaces. Presenters will focus on services offered during times of change and transformation as art library spaces are renovated or moved to new locations. Topics of discussion by presenters will include the provision of temporary space services as pop-up libraries within the studio environment, the delivery and continuation of multiple services during a renovation, and the process of permanently closing down a branch academic art library and opening a new dedicated art collections space within the main university library. In considering the theme of this year’s conference, this session will emphasize the collaborative nature of space planning as librarians and others work to support users’ research and educational needs across different environments and organizational cultures.

Moderators
KK

Kristina Keogh

Director of Library Services, RIngling College of Art and Design

Speakers
avatar for Jasmine Burns

Jasmine Burns

Visual Resources Metadata Librarian, Cornell University
avatar for Sarah Dickinson

Sarah Dickinson

Research Support Services Librarian, Harvard University. Graduate School of Design. Frances Loeb Library


Tuesday February 7, 2017 2:15pm - 3:15pm
Camp Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

3:30pm

Poster Session
Sponsored by Clemson University
Poster Abstracts are listed here: https://www.arlisna.org/neworleans2017/posters.php

1. Data + Art: data driven art in studio art courses
--  Megan Martinsen, Baylor University and Ben Johansen, Baylor University

2. A Ticket to the World of Information & Visual Literacy: Introducing Freshmen to Comics and Graphic Novels
-- Olivia Miller, Public Services Librarian, Greensboro College

3. Visualizing Arguments: Constructing Comics to Unpack Scholarly Texts --  Samantha Kirk, Reference and Information Literacy Librarian, University of Pennsylvania Libraries and Patricia Guardiola, Assistant Head, Fisher Fine Arts Library, University of Pennsylvania Libraries


4. Curating Relationships: Art Museum Programming for Internal and External Outreach -- Catherine Robertson, Reference Librarian, Phillips Library, Peabody Essex Museum

5. Metadata and Liaison Librarian Collaboration: Using Outreach and Metadata to Enhance Access to a Local Art Collection -- Jennifer Mayer Head, Library Research Services, University of Northern Colorado and  Bryan Ricupero, Metadata Librarian, University of Wyoming

6. Biophilic Design for Libraries: Integrating and Referencing Nature to Create More Human-Centered Spaces -- Rebecca Barham, Art Librarian, University of North Texas; Erin O'Toole, Science Librarian, University of North Texas; and Susan Smith, Head of Library Research and Support Services, University of North Texas

7. Student Paintings, Tattoo artists, and Scientists: the Rutgers Art Library Exhibition Spaces -- Megan Lotts, Art Librarian, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey

8. Artcaching: Exploring the Visual Arts of Baton Rouge, New Orleans and Beyond Through GPS-based Gaming --  Marty Miller, Art & Design Librarian, Louisiana State University

9. An App for an architectural images collaborative environment: Arquigrafia -- Artur Simões, Rozestraten Professor, School of Architecture and Urbanism of University of São Paulo and Vânia Mara Alves Lima, Professor, School of Communications and Arts of University of São Paulo

10. How do #BlackLivesMatter in the DPLA? -- Tatiana Bryant, Special Collections Librarian, University of Oregon

11. The Art of Costume Design: The Work of Dunya Ramicova -- Jerrold Shiroma, Digital Assets Librarian, University of California, Merced

12. Marketing & Outreach in the Architecture & Design Library -- Bronwyn Dorhofer, Access Services & Outreach Librarian, University of Oregon Portland Library & Learning Commons and Karen Munro, Head, University of Oregon Portland Library & Learning Commons

13. Facsimiles as Open Access for Interactive Research -- Brittany Boler, Research Assistant, Florida State University

14. The Evolution of C.O.O.L. (Collaboration, Outreach, and Organization (in the) Library) -- Nicole LaMoreaux, Assistant Director of Research & Instructional Services, The New School and Lauren Gavin, Technical Services & Reference Librarian, LIM College

15. Fun and Games in the Art/Music Library: Developing a Video Game Collection -- Stephanie Frontz, Art Librarian and Head, Art/Music Library University of Rochester

16. Is this any way to learn RDA? -- Julia Wisniewski, Cataloging Librarian, Library of Congress

17. Exhibits, Please!: Developing a Robust Exhibit Program for Academic Libraries -- Elizabeth Meinke, Librarian, Case Western Reserve University Kelvin Smith Library

18. Virtual Visitors to the Artists’ Books Collection: Making Fair Use Work for Your Online Project -- Sarah Carter, Director, Bridwell Art Library University of Louisville and Alex O'Keefe, LIS Graduate Student, University of Kentucky

19. Opening Doors Online: Virtual Tours as Wayfinding Tools -- Patricia Guardiola, Assistant Head, Fisher Fine Arts Library, University of Pennsylvania

20. From Comic Book to Text Book: Communicating the Value of Cartoon Art Across University Classrooms --  Caitlin McGurk, Associate Curator, Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University Billy Ireland Cartoon Library & Museum

21. Reciprocal Relationships: Student Organizations and Professionals -- Kendra Werst, Student, President of SALS, Indiana University and Andrew Wang, Student, Secretary of SALS, Indiana University

22. ArLiSNAP New Professional Travel Award Crowdfunding Campaign -- Breanne Crumpton, Fellow, GSK Library, North Carolina Museum of Art; Heather Slania, Director, Decker Library, Maryland Institute College of Art; Courtney Baron, Teaching and Learning Librarian, Oxford College of Emory University ; and Tiffany Saulter, User Services Manager, Technical Lead, Artstor

23. CREATE: Adapting the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy to Studio Art & Creative Research Practices -- Amanda Meeks, Teaching Learning and Research Services/Arts and Humanities, Northern Arizona University; Ashley Peterson, Research & Instruction Librarian, School of the Museum of Fine Arts at Tufts University; Larissa Garcia, Information Literacy Librarian / Art & FCNS Subject Specialist, Northern Illinois University and Alyssa Vincent, Information Services Librarian/Psychology and Art liaison, Northeastern Illinois University

24. Edit-a-thons as Outreach: Connecting with Students and Faculty through Collaboration -- Leah Sherman, Visual & Performing Arts Librarian, Florida State University Libraries; Michelle Demeter, Distance & Outreach Coordinator, Florida State University Libraries; and Jessica Evans Brady, Research & Collections Librarian, Fine Arts Library, Harvard University

25. Putting Libraries on the Map: How Technological Innovation Can Impact Reference Services -- Giana Ricci,  Samuel H. Kress NYARC Fellow, Brooklyn Museum Libraries and Archives

26. Initiating Inter-departmental Collaboration: Bringing Student Art into the RPS Libraries -- Vaughan Hennen, Digital Design & Access Librarian, Dakota State University

27. Documenting Creative Activity: Institutional Repositories and Fine Arts Faculty -- Kate Lambaria, Fine Arts Librarian, University of Nevada, Las Vegas

28. Visualizing Catalog Data: A Collection Assessment of the Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library -- Meredith Hale, Kress Fellow in Art Librarianship, Yale University Libraries

29. A Special Place on the South Side: Stony Island Arts Bank -- Courtney Becks, Graduate Student, School of Library and Information Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

30. Artists' Books Holdings -- Megan De Armond, Assistant Digital and Metadata Librarian, Frick Art Reference Library, The Frick Collection and Abigail Purcell, Intern, Margaret L. Wendt Archive & Resource Center, Forest Lawn

31. Cities in Text: Rome - Virtual Tools to Study the Built Environment -- Jennifer Parker, Head, Architecture Library, University of Notre Dame and Viveca Robichaud, Special Collections Librarian, University of Notre Dame

32. A New Path for Materials Collections: A Shared Materials Database and Materials Consortium -- Johanna Kasubowski, Materials and Media Collections Librarian, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Frances Loeb Library; Mark Pompelia, Visual + Material Resource Librarian, Rhode Island School of Design, Fleet Library; Alix Reiskind, Digital Initiatives Librarian, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Frances Loeb Library; and Ann Whiteside, Librarian/Assistant, Dean for Information Services, Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Frances Loeb Library

33. The Art of Outreach: Using Student Artwork as Outreach at a Public University Library -- Maia Hajj, Research and Instructional Services Librarian, University of Memphis and Caitlin Harrington, Electronic Resources Librarian, University of Memphis

34. Display -> Play -> ???: Reconfiguring Artists’ Books Instruction -- Sara DeWaay, Art and Architecture Librarian, University of Oregon

35. Zines as Outreach (Or: How to Get Ecologists Involved in Art-Making) -- Stacy Brinkman, Interim Head of Information Services, Miami University Libraries; Carly Sentieri, Curator of Special Collections, Miami University Libraries; Erin Vonnahme, Humanities Librarian, Miami University Libraries

36. Establishing an Open Access MFA Thesis Collection -- Jennifer Akins, Subject Librarian for Art and Architecture, Washington University in St. Louis

37. ALPACA Advocacy NOW! Encouraging Supportive Policies for Working Parents in Libraries -- Kim Loconto, Assistant Archivist, Brooklyn Museum; Cathryn Copper, Librarian, Woodbury University School of Architecture; Elizabeth Lane, Branch Manager, Hartford Public Library, Hartford, CT

Poster Abstracts are listed here: https://www.arlisna.org/neworleans2017/posters.php


Tuesday, Feb. 7th
7:30am-10am Poster Set Up
Poster presenters should plan on putting up their poster according to their assigned numbers in the poster display area in The District (see hotel map). There will be members of the poster committee here to help you. Tacks will also be provided.

Wednesday, Feb. 8th
12:30pm-2pm
Poster presenters should plan on removing their poster during this time period.


Tuesday February 7, 2017 3:30pm - 4:30pm
The District Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130
 
Wednesday, February 8
 

9:30am

President's Choice Panel: Open Access Publishing

Description:  Leaders from ARLIS/NA’s affiliate societies will discuss the changing role of publishing, and specifically strategies for open access publishing, in professional and scholarly societies.
 
Speakers:
Teresa Brinati, Director of Publishing, Society of American Archivists
Irene Herold, President, Association of College and Research Libraries
Gail Feigenbaum, Vice President for Publications, College Art Association
 
Moderator: Daniel Payne, Chair, ARLIS/NA Open Access Task Force

This session will be recorded and made accessible after the conference in the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal.

Moderators
DP

Daniel Payne

Head, Instructional Services, The Ontario College of Art and Design University
Chair, ARLIS/NA Open Access Task Force

Speakers
TB

Teresa Brinati

Director of Publishing, Society of American Archivists
GF

Gail Feigenbaum

Vice President for Publications, College Art Association
IH

Irene Herold

President, Association of College and Research Libraries

Sponsors
avatar for University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries

University of Florida George A. Smathers Libraries

Sponsor of the President's Choice Panel: Open Access Publishing


Wednesday February 8, 2017 9:30am - 10:30am
Royal Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

9:30am

Instruction in Sync: Faculty-Librarian Collaborations in the Classroom
Sponsored by Duke University Libraries

Shira Loev Eller, Art & Design Librarian and Rachel Pollack, Instructor of Writing (The George Washington University): Navigating Museum, Library, and Scholarly Discourse: A Librarian/Professor Instruction Partnership

Eva Sclippa, Art Librarian and Coordinator of Instruction and Dr. Kate Dimitrova, Professor of Art History (Alfred University): Artists in the Classroom: Creative Processes in Art History Information Literacy Classes

Lyndsay Bratton, Digital Scholarship and Visual Resources Librarian (Connecticut College): Digital Humanities Assignments for Undergraduates: A Case Study in Architectural Studies

In teaching information literacy, collaborations between librarians and professors allow for more intentional learning and more successful approaches to pedagogical challenges. This session explores three collaborative endeavors: introducing undergraduate students to digital humanities research methods; integrating art historical research and artistic practice for studio art students; and helping students navigate the conceptual spaces where art historical research converges—the museum, the library, and scholarly discourse. Professor Rachel Pollack and Librarian Shira Loev Eller discuss their partnership in teaching University Writing, a required critical writing course for first year students. In Pollack’s course, the professor guides the class through analyzing Dutch paintings at the National Gallery of Art, while the librarian instructs them in information literacy. The presenters will describe their process of collaboration in guiding undergraduates through museum and library “spaces” so that students can successfully engage with the scholarly conversation around an artwork. Teaching art history information literacy to studio art students presents unique challenges—how can librarians and professors clearly demonstrate the connection between the skills needed to research their subjects and the physical act of artistic creation? This collaboration between librarian Eva Sclippa and art history professor Kate Dimitrova brings new tools to the challenge. Attendees will learn about ways in which students in our classes expand their research skills through assignments and projects that also engage their creative faculties. Collaboration is essential to digital humanities (DH) work, from the individual project to sustaining a center or program. Librarian Lyndsay Bratton partnered with Professor Emily Morash to pilot a DH assignment in which student teams scanned volumes of an unindexed journal and developed digital projects that make the resource more accessible for undergraduate research. This case study considers challenges in introducing undergraduates to DH research, and offers recommendations for how best to implement digital humanities assignments in the classroom.

Moderators
avatar for Patty Guardiola

Patty Guardiola

Assistant Head, Fisher Fine Arts Library, University of Pennsylvania

Speakers
avatar for Lyndsay Bratton

Lyndsay Bratton

Digital Scholarship and Visual Resources Librarian, Connecticut College
avatar for Shira Loev Eller

Shira Loev Eller

Art and Design Librarian, George Washington University
Talk to me about artists' books, art and design students, collection development, library instruction, liaison work, and art librarianship in an academic library.
RP

Rachel Pollack

Instructor of Writing, The George Washington University
ES

Eva Sclippa

Art Librarian and Coordinator of Instruction, Alfred University

Sponsors
avatar for Duke University Libraries

Duke University Libraries

Sponsor of the Instruction in Sync: Faculty-Librarian Collaborations in the Classroom Session


Wednesday February 8, 2017 9:30am - 10:30am
Jefferson Ballroom Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

9:30am

Scope Drift: New Directions in Visual Resources
In project management, “scope creep” describes the continuous expansion of the requirements, mission, and objectives of a project. Although often perceived as a negative, in the fields of art librarianship and visual resources the drifting of professional scope can be both a force driving innovation and an indicator of change. Following up on the successful session on this topic sponsored by the Visual Resources Division (VRD) at the 2016 ARLIS/NA+VRA conference, this panel will present case studies illuminating how visual resources duties are expanding and shifting in digital contexts. In alignment with the topics of interests proposed for the 2017 conference, presentations will address one or more of the following areas: Digital Humanities/Digital Art History Collection Development and Management User Experience Digitization and Preservation of Digital Collections Scholarly Communications, Hannah Marshall will speak about the theory and practice of digital curation as it relates to digital cultural heritage and the expanding role of the 'digital curator', Marian Lambers will discuss case studies from the College of Creative Studies, and Katherina Fostano will present on her visual resource center's responses to changing faculty needs. Panelists will discuss the challenges of addressing new demands from organizations and users, as well as the opportunities for broadening collaborations.

Moderators
avatar for Alexandra Provo

Alexandra Provo

Digital Production Editor, NYU
I'm the 2016-2017 Visual Resources Division moderator. At this year's conference, I'll be speaking about my work as Project Manager, Florentine Renaissance Drawings: A Linked Catalogue for the Semantic Web, Villa I Tatti, Harvard University. I'll also be sharing some fair use-related work I did as the 2015-2016 Kress Fellow in Art Librarianship.

Speakers
avatar for Katherina Fostano

Katherina Fostano

Visual Resources Curator, Department of Art History and Music, Fordham University
avatar for Marian Lambers

Marian Lambers

Visual Resources Curator, College for Creative Studies
avatar for Hannah Marshall

Hannah Marshall

Implementation Manager, Artstor


Wednesday February 8, 2017 9:30am - 10:30am
Commerce Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

12:00pm

Diversity Forum

The Diversity Forum will be a safe space for ARLIS/NA members and other conference attendees to discuss issues of concern and how we can work together to develop concrete steps to uphold our diversity and inclusion values.

Diversity and inclusion are one of ARLIS/NA’s core values, articulated as follows: “Diversity and inclusion in all aspects of the profession strengthens the practice of art librarianship, and enriches library collections and user experiences.”  Diversity and inclusion are also embedded in ARLIS/NA’s strategic directions: “The Society shall promote diversity and inclusion within the profession including the makeup of its workforce, the design of services and programming, the development of intercultural fluency skills and competencies, and the practice of inclusive collections building.”

Since the Diversity Forum will take place from 12:00pm-1:00pm, attendees are encouraged to bring their lunch or a snack. Grab-and-go meals are conveniently available on the hotel's second level at the River Blends Cafe (2nd Level, Main Building) and Marketplace (2nd Level, Riverside Building). For more information, please see the complete list of hotel dining options here.


Speakers
avatar for Heather Gendron

Heather Gendron

President, ARLIS/NA, Yale University Library


Wednesday February 8, 2017 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Jefferson Ballroom Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

1:15pm

Critical Information Literacy in Art and Design Libraries
The concept of critical information literacy is now a decade old and has gleaned a substantive body of library literature. But librarians still often struggle with making the social justice concepts key to critical information literacy “sticky” for art and design students who often question the relevance of research skills to their practice. On the heels of conversations about the ACRL Framework for Information Literacy, this session will serve as a discussion of standards for visual literacy, including where it intersects with critical librarianship. Stephanie Grimm, Research and Instruction Librarian, Savannah College of Art and Design will present a model for a series of anti-stereotype visual research workshops that consider the existing visual literacy standards through the lens of critical librarianship and feminist pedagogy. Though initially developed for comic artists and illustrators, the workshop has grown to include strategies and activities that can be adapted for visual artists in general. Maryland Institute College of Art’s Siân Evans, Instruction Librarian, and Jennifer Ferretti, Digital Initiatives Librarian, will address two main aspects of their new critical information literacy program: engaged instruction and topical research guides. Specifically, they will discuss a “Beyoncé-based” library instruction session geared towards first year art and design students who had limited research experience. With themes such as current events and popular culture at the center, instruction and online tools help to engage students with information resources and research methodologies to help understand their work and their environment.


This session will be recorded and made accessible after the conference in the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal.

Moderators
avatar for Kelly Smith

Kelly Smith

Senior Implementation Manager, Artstor

Speakers
avatar for Sian Evans

Sian Evans

Instruction Librarian, Maryland Institute College of Art
avatar for Jennifer Ferretti

Jennifer Ferretti

Digital Initiatives Librarian, Maryland Institute College of Art
Latina Librarian, promoting #libeyrianship and Information Literacy Everywhere.
avatar for Stephanie Grimm

Stephanie Grimm

Art and Art History Librarian, George Mason University
Reader, researcher, and sometimes maker of comics.


Wednesday February 8, 2017 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Royal Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

1:15pm

Does the Walker Choose the Path, or the Path the Walker: International Perspectives on Art Librarianship
Co-sponsored by the International Relations and Professional Development Committees, this session explores how individuals in different parts of the world establish and develop careers in art librarianship. What are the core competencies, standard curricula, and career development venues in various countries? Where do our practices coincide, how do they differ, and what can we learn from each other? Are there critical competencies—new or traditional—that our library schools and professional organizations are failing to cultivate? And what are the opportunities for international cross-pollination such as cross-border internships or job exchanges? An international panel will offer a range of perspectives on issues such as these.

Vânia Mara Alves Lima, Ph.D Professor of School of Communications and Arts - University Of Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil
"Education and professional development of art librarians in Brazil"

Dr. Katharina Koop, Lehrstuhl für Kunstgeschichte, Architecture Faculty, Aachen University, Aachen, Germany
“With a little help from my friends: Professional Development of Art Librarians in Germany-- Programs and Trends"

Kit Messick, Head of Special Collections Cataloging, Getty Research Institute
“A staff exchange between research institutes: the Getty Research Institute/ Institut National d’Histoire d’art experience”

Michiel Nijhoff, Team Leader, Library/Information Centre, Stedilijk Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands
“Becoming a Librarian in Holland—Don’t Even Think of It”


Moderators
avatar for Deborah Kempe

Deborah Kempe

Chief, Collections Management & Access, Frick Art Reference Library of The Frick Collection
I am Chief of Collections Management & Access at The Frick Art Reference Library of The Frick Collection, in New York, with previous positions held at the Avery Art & Architectural Library of Columbia University, New York University, the New-York Historical Society, and the University of Arkansas. My academic background includes a BA with Honors in Art History and Archaeology and an MLS, both from the University of Missouri. I'm active in... Read More →

Wednesday February 8, 2017 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Jefferson Ballroom Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

1:15pm

Leaving the Good Old Days Behind: Data-Driven Research Going Forward
William Blueher will discuss the development of a digital humanities tool that allows users to engage with the entire corpus of Metropolitan Museum of Art publications in a novel way. It provides users with a new and intuitive access point to this large set of data, producing a whole new way of accessing this material. Most remarkably of all, this tool was built in just over a semester by a single graduate assistant working one day a week (in consultation with two professional librarians), and this talk will focus both on how libraries can begin developing DH tools without large allocations of staff time and how the development of these tools can serve a pedagogic purpose as we help train emerging library professionals.

Sarah Seymore will discuss the impact of recently released datasets from museums like the MOMA, Tate Collection, and other cultural heritage institutions that have prompted interest in exploring what art historical data has to offer. With the results of her survey on art historical data usage (http://goo.gl/forms/Uc3bEsMitR0w81af1), she will analyze how art historians and others are using this data and what is being done with datasets related to art history. This talk will describe the results of the survey and further implications of those results, as well as examine the current state of open art historical datasets.

Moderators
avatar for Sarah Osborne Bender

Sarah Osborne Bender

Director of the Library and Research Center, National Museum of Women in the Arts

Speakers
avatar for William Blueher

William Blueher

Metadata & Collections Librarian, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Thomas J. Watson Library
Metadata & Collections Librarian, Metropolitan Museum of Art
avatar for Sarah Seymore

Sarah Seymore

Digital Collections Metadata Librarian, University of Oregon Libraries
Sarah Seymore joined the Digital Scholarship Center at the UO Libraries in March 2014 after completing her MLIS from Rutgers University. She is interested in digital collection cataloging, digitization project management, and metadata and Linked Open Data.


Wednesday February 8, 2017 1:15pm - 2:15pm
Commerce Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

2:30pm

Fundraising: Matching Your Needs to a Donor’s Wants

Need funding big or small for your library project? This panel will explore several strategies for successful fundraising including friends' groups, approaching individual donors, grants, and crowdfunding. Speakers will help map what works (and doesn't work) in library fundraising and come away with an integrated picture of how to go about fundraising for their library.

Attendees will be encouraged to actively participate in a facilitated conversation on this important issue!

 


Moderators
avatar for Heather Slania

Heather Slania

Library Director, Maryland Inst. College of Art

Speakers
AC

Andrew Corrigan

Associate Dean of Libraries, Chief Collections Officer
avatar for Ann Roll

Ann Roll

Collection Development Librarian, CSU Fullerton
avatar for Heather Slania

Heather Slania

Library Director, Maryland Inst. College of Art


Wednesday February 8, 2017 2:30pm - 3:30pm
Commerce Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

2:30pm

New Voices in the Profession
Returning for its eleventh year, New Voices in the Profession provides professionals new to art librarianship the opportunity to present topics from exceptional coursework, such as a master's thesis, or topics with which they are engaged early in their professional life. New professionals are defined as either students in MLIS or Master's programs leading to a career in art librarianship, or those within five years of Master's level study. For many, this is their first professional speaking engagement. This panel began at the ARLIS/NA 2006 Annual Conference in Banff and has since received wide attention and praise. Topics presented reveal new ideas as well as different ways of thinking about established concepts. Speakers give the conference attendees a glimpse of academic interests and current discourses of the newest ARLIS/NA members. The New Voices session is organized by the Professional Development Committee, ArLiSNAP, the Gerd Muehsam Award Committee, and the Sotheby's Institute of Art Research Award Committee.

Angelique Roy, University of Toronto, Faculty of Information Alumnus, “Mass Exodus: Capturing and Preserving Tacit Knowledge in the Art Library—and why this matters for us as new voices in the profession”                                            

Nicole Lovenjak, Librarian/Archivist, University of Dayton for The Dayton Art Institute (2016 DAI Library Study), “Respecting the Past, Planning for the Future: A Report on the First Phase of the Dayton Art Institute’s Library Study and Collection Assessment”

Jade Finlinson, MLIS Candidate, UCLA Graduate School of Education & Information Studies, 2017 Gerd Muehsam Award Winner, "Exploring Community Memory and Multiple Understandings of Landscape: Activating UCLA's Dept. of Geography Air Photo Archives"

S.E. Hackney, PhD student, University of Pittsburgh, School of Information Sciences, and Lily Brewer, PhD student, University of Pittsburgh, Department of History of Art and Architecture, 2017 Sotheby’s Institute of Art Research Award Winners, "Historical 'Big Data': Visualizations of Algernon Graves' Art Sales in the Early 20th Century and Today"                          

This session will be recorded and made accessible after the conference in the ARLIS/NA Learning Portal.

Moderators
IM

Ian McDermott (co-moderator)

Instruction Librarian, LaGuardia Community College, CUNY
avatar for Karen Stafford

Karen Stafford

Head of Technical Services, Art Institute of Chicago, Ryerson & Burnham Libraries

Speakers
avatar for S. E. Hackney

S. E. Hackney

Doctoral Student, University of Pittsburgh
AR

Angelique Roy

Community Outreach & Volunteer Services Librarian, Cochrane Public Library


Wednesday February 8, 2017 2:30pm - 4:00pm
Royal Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130

4:15pm

Arts Plenary: Visual Perceptions of Louisiana
This plenary session will begin with Artist's Talks from three Louisiana based artists whose work is influenced by the people, places, and traditions of the state. After the presentations, the artists will answer questions about their works and experiences. Gus Bennett works as a photographer in New Orleans where he documents the people that make up the city in his New Orleans People Project. Dale Newkirk is an Associate Professor of Art + Design and the Director of the Southeastern Contemporary Art Gallery at Southeastern Louisiana University in Hammond Louisiana. His sculptures are exhibited at the Cole Pratt Gallery in New Orleans where he is represented. Kelli Scott Kelly has written and illustrated an art book titled Accalia and the Swamp Monster. She illustrates on repurposed linens and creates objects from mixed media. She is currently an art professor at Louisiana State University.

Moderators
avatar for Shelia Cork

Shelia Cork

Librarian, New Orleans Museum of Art
One person libraries | New Orleans | Bird watching
NH

Nancy Hampton

Head of Collection Resources, Xavier University of Louisiana
Nancy Hampton is currently responsible for the planning, implementation, and management of all continuing resources and manuscripts in both print and electronic formats.

Wednesday February 8, 2017 4:15pm - 5:30pm
Jefferson Ballroom Hilton New Orleans Riverside, Two Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA 70130